The intention was to give the feel of something that may have formed naturally following the eruption of a volcano. For this, I used very unusual materials to colour the inner and outer surface. This one of those pieces that no school would allow me to make in their classes. Thank goodness I had the trust of an amazing glazing mentor (Marie Cote), who allowed me to follow my fascination for glazing and firing mistakes, and how they made beautifully unique pieces. This piece was hand-built from a large slab of stoneware, folded when still quite wet, and taped onto a smalled slab for the base. I smoothed the surface with a damp sponge. I let it stand to a damp-leather hard, then thickly brush-applied a slip heavily infused with black iron oxide powder. The outside rings were painted with raw pigments in water, applied very thickly. The dark rings between the colours (yellow, red, and brown) are made from a sponged on black stain. The strange bumps you see in the brown ring are actually small clumps of asphalt I brought back from an artist colony outside Sedona, AZ, called Jerome. I saw a local potter use the technique in her gas kiln and wondered how what it would do in my electric kiln. The only consistent effect is that it looks and feels (has the same fragility) as fine volcanic pumice. On this piece, it also pulled some of the clear glaze and pigment from the clay. The whole piece was dipped ina clear glaze before final firing at Cone 6.

Dimensions: H-15″ (38.1cm) x W-7″ (17.8cm) x D-6″ (15.2cm) Available to own for $450 (plus shipping and handling)

See more at Arts MPerron @ https://1-mario-perron.pixels.com

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9 thoughts on “Striations

    1. Thank you, Krista.
      I was experimenting a lot wth pure pigments at the time and the results were fun. This one has a very watercolour feel to the colours on the outside. The inside feels like volcanic stone or rough concrete. The contrast adds a wonderful tension to the piece.

      Like

    1. Thank you, Goff.
      I agree. It’s taken me a lifetime to realize that material play and experimentation is the central part of my artistic process. It involves the intellectual stimulus of problem solving while working out “mistakes” or challenges, and the joyful anticipation of surprise outcomes.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Cheers. It is the anticipation and unknown outcome that is so exciting. I loved the ceramics module whilst studying. Nearly went down that path but mixed media got the better of me. Best Regards. Goff

        Liked by 1 person

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